We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infintesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. We have no present. Our consciousness is almost completely preoccupied with memory and expectation. We do not realize that there never was, is, nor will be any other experience than present experience. We are therefore out of touch with reality. We confuse the world as talked about, described, and measured with the world which actually is. We are sick with a fascination for the useful tools of names and numbers, of symbols, signs, conceptions and ideas.
written by Alan Watts

(Source: thecalminside, via elige)

384 notes
hadrian6:

Pythagoreans Hymn to the Rising Sun. 1869. Fedor Bronnikov. Russian 1827-1902. oil/canvas.
http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

hadrian6:

Pythagoreans Hymn to the Rising Sun. 1869. Fedor Bronnikov. Russian 1827-1902. oil/canvas.

http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

(via exites)

3,159 notes

novub:

i havent seen ANYONE discuss what fox news said about muslims. and the growing tension towards muslims after news stations saying they’re scared of ISIS sleeper cells in the US (because muslims are always, always targeted and bombarded with surveillance and locked up and killed under false pretenses of terrorism when this happens) and it fucking scares me so fucking much.

(via gummo1997)

yungradical:

kidsuke:

Animal Collective - Loch Raven 

dream sequence

(via tarbor)

29,836 notes
reddlr-trees:


My favorite anti-weed ad

reddlr-trees:

My favorite anti-weed ad

(via pureimagiiination)

46,787 notes
vladimirnootin:

aboutwhitewomen:

vladimirnootin:

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man
Here’s what I found after looking into it. 
Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding. 
On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judge, Mohammed al-għadha who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.
Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.
But in 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.
Also this girl has her own book

I just want some feminists to focus more on this than on defending Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian.

Realistically, what can they do? Most of the feminists that you likely encounter are based in USA, Canada, maybe UK. What can they do to affect attitudes and policies in a place like Yemen?

They can raise awareness. Tumblr is a global site where you can donate to people in many countries to aid them. A very good thing they can do, for one, is set up donations for this kid or other kids. They can put efforts to start up shelters for such incidents. There’s a lot of things western feminists can do. This post only has almost 9k posts, whereas a post about male tears has 36K.

vladimirnootin:

aboutwhitewomen:

vladimirnootin:

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man

Here’s what I found after looking into it. 

Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding.

On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judgeMohammed al-għadha who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.

Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.

But in 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.

Also this girl has her own book

I just want some feminists to focus more on this than on defending Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian.

Realistically, what can they do? Most of the feminists that you likely encounter are based in USA, Canada, maybe UK. What can they do to affect attitudes and policies in a place like Yemen?

They can raise awareness. Tumblr is a global site where you can donate to people in many countries to aid them.

A very good thing they can do, for one, is set up donations for this kid or other kids. They can put efforts to start up shelters for such incidents.

There’s a lot of things western feminists can do. This post only has almost 9k posts, whereas a post about male tears has 36K.

(via mangomamita)

11,862 notes

Aerial Shot of Muhammed Ali after knocking out Cleveland Williams in 1966.

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

(via blo)

rubyscoobydont:

one of my favorite things about watching sunny is catching the cast either breaking or trying to hide their laughter so here’s a two minute compilation of it happening

(via artvevo)

I asked seven anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians if they would rather have been a typical Indian or a typical European in 1491. None was delighted by the question, because it required judging the past by the standards of today—a fallacy disparaged as “presentism” by social scientists. But every one chose to be an Indian. Some early colonists gave the same answer. Horrifying the leaders of Jamestown and Plymouth, scores of English ran off to live with the Indians. My ancestor shared their desire, which is what led to the trumped-up murder charges against him—or that’s what my grandfather told me, anyway.

As for the Indians, evidence suggests that they often viewed Europeans with disdain. The Hurons, a chagrined missionary reported, thought the French possessed “little intelligence in comparison to themselves.” Europeans, Indians said, were physically weak, sexually untrustworthy, atrociously ugly, and just plain dirty. (Spaniards, who seldom if ever bathed, were amazed by the Aztec desire for personal cleanliness.) A Jesuit reported that the “Savages” were disgusted by handkerchiefs: “They say, we place what is unclean in a fine white piece of linen, and put it away in our pockets as something very precious, while they throw it upon the ground.” The Micmac scoffed at the notion of French superiority. If Christian civilization was so wonderful, why were its inhabitants leaving?

Like people everywhere, Indians survived by cleverly exploiting their environment. Europeans tended to manage land by breaking it into fragments for farmers and herders. Indians often worked on such a grand scale that the scope of their ambition can be hard to grasp. They created small plots, as Europeans did (about 1.5 million acres of terraces still exist in the Peruvian Andes), but they also reshaped entire landscapes to suit their purposes. A principal tool was fire, used to keep down underbrush and create the open, grassy conditions favorable for game. Rather than domesticating animals for meat, Indians retooled whole ecosystems to grow bumper crops of elk, deer, and bison. The first white settlers in Ohio found forests as open as English parks—they could drive carriages through the woods. Along the Hudson River the annual fall burning lit up the banks for miles on end; so flashy was the show that the Dutch in New Amsterdam boated upriver to goggle at the blaze like children at fireworks. In North America, Indian torches had their biggest impact on the Midwestern prairie, much or most of which was created and maintained by fire. Millennia of exuberant burning shaped the plains into vast buffalo farms. When Indian societies disintegrated, forest invaded savannah in Wisconsin, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, and the Texas Hill Country. Is it possible that the Indians changed the Americas more than the invading Europeans did? “The answer is probably yes for most regions for the next 250 years or so” after Columbus, William Denevan wrote, “and for some regions right up to the present time.”


written by

Quoted from the essay "1941" written by Charles C. Mann, about the major impact that Native Americans had on the Americas (ecologically and culturally) before white people invaded, bringing their diseases and shoving Christianity down the Indians’ throats and murdering them and banning their cultures.

Check out the whole piece (which is rather long). (P.S thanks to @cazalis for sending me this great link)

another excerpt:

Human history, in Crosby’s interpretation, is marked by two world-altering centers of invention: the Middle East and central Mexico, where Indian groups independently created nearly all of the Neolithic innovations, writing included. The Neolithic Revolution began in the Middle East about 10,000 years ago. In the next few millennia humankind invented the wheel, the metal tool, and agriculture. The Sumerians eventually put these inventions together, added writing, and became the world’s first civilization. Afterward Sumeria’s heirs in Europe and Asia frantically copied one another’s happiest discoveries; innovations ricocheted from one corner of Eurasia to another, stimulating technological progress. Native Americans, who had crossed to Alaska before Sumeria, missed out on the bounty. “They had to do everything on their own,” Crosby says. Remarkably, they succeeded.

When Columbus appeared in the Caribbean, the descendants of the world’s two Neolithic civilizations collided, with overwhelming consequences for both. American Neolithic development occurred later than that of the Middle East, possibly because the Indians needed more time to build up the requisite population density. Without beasts of burden they could not capitalize on the wheel (for individual workers on uneven terrain skids are nearly as effective as carts for hauling), and they never developed steel. But in agriculture they handily outstripped the children of Sumeria. Every tomato in Italy, every potato in Ireland, and every hot pepper in Thailand came from this hemisphere. Worldwide, more than half the crops grown today were initially developed in the Americas.

Maize, as corn is called in the rest of the world, was a triumph with global implications. Indians developed an extraordinary number of maize varieties for different growing conditions, which meant that the crop could and did spread throughout the planet. Central and Southern Europeans became particularly dependent on it; maize was the staple of Serbia, Romania, and Moldavia by the nineteenth century. Indian crops dramatically reduced hunger, Crosby says, which led to an Old World population boom.

Along with peanuts and manioc, maize came to Africa and transformed agriculture there, too. “The probability is that the population of Africa was greatly increased because of maize and other American Indian crops,” Crosby says. “Those extra people helped make the slave trade possible.” Maize conquered Africa at the time when introduced diseases were leveling Indian societies. The Spanish, the Portuguese, and the British were alarmed by the death rate among Indians, because they wanted to exploit them as workers. Faced with a labor shortage, the Europeans turned their eyes to Africa. The continent’s quarrelsome societies helped slave traders to siphon off millions of people. The maize-fed population boom, Crosby believes, let the awful trade continue without pumping the well dry.

Back home in the Americas, Indian agriculture long sustained some of the world’s largest cities. The Aztec capital of Tenochtitlán dazzled Hernán Cortés in 1519; it was bigger than Paris, Europe’s greatest metropolis. The Spaniards gawped like hayseeds at the wide streets, ornately carved buildings, and markets bright with goods from hundreds of miles away. They had never before seen a city with botanical gardens, for the excellent reason that none existed in Europe. The same novelty attended the force of a thousand men that kept the crowded streets immaculate. (Streets that weren’t ankle-deep in sewage! The conquistadors had never heard of such a thing.) Central America was not the only locus of prosperity. Thousands of miles north, John Smith, of Pocahontas fame, visited Massachusetts in 1614, before it was emptied by disease, and declared that the land was “so planted with Gardens and Corne fields, and so well inhabited with a goodly, strong and well proportioned people … [that] I would rather live here than any where.”

and another excerpt:

In as yet unpublished research the archaeologists Eduardo Neves, of the University of São Paulo; Michael Heckenberger, of the University of Florida; and their colleagues examined terra preta in the upper Xingu, a huge southern tributary of the Amazon. Not all Xingu cultures left behind this living earth, they discovered. But the ones that did generated it rapidly—suggesting to Woods that terra preta was created deliberately. In a process reminiscent of dropping microorganism-rich starter into plain dough to create sourdough bread, Amazonian peoples, he believes, inoculated bad soil with a transforming bacterial charge. Not every group of Indians there did this, but quite a few did, and over an extended period of time.

When Woods told me this, I was so amazed that I almost dropped the phone. I ceased to be articulate for a moment and said things like “wow” and “gosh.” Woods chuckled at my reaction, probably because he understood what was passing through my mind. Faced with an ecological problem, I was thinking, the Indians fixed it. They were in the process of terraforming the Amazon when Columbus showed up and ruined everything.

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

(via b1a4gasms)

continuants:

rosalarian:

coelasquid:

Sometimes body modification is just a way of telling yourself “this is still my house, I paint the walls and and I hang the art because I’m the one who owns it”

PREACH

(via arabellesicardi)

redgaloshesforfeet:

倉橋ヨエコ ~ 電話

Hello, it’s sunny over here.

Hello, is it rainy over there?

Hello, are you doing well?

Hello, I am a coward.

(via gorlsday)

787 notes
uoa:

nninfia:

emobean:

rick-owen:


Vogue Italia Jul. 2004 - Trendspotting by Steven Meisel
(via steven-meisel)

uoa:

nninfia:

emobean:

rick-owen:

Vogue Italia Jul. 2004 - Trendspotting by Steven Meisel

(via steven-meisel)